Maria and Apollo

“Do you mind if I sit here?” Asks the women in a bright purple shirt with shoulder blond hair and brown doe eyes.

I’m seated at the Whole Foods dining area reading my book, enjoying my coffee and small salad while taking in an invigorating, sunny spring day.

Earlier she was in front of me at the grocery check-out line. Her legs appear to bother her and after paying the cashier, she shuffles off to the side when she glances toward me: “Go ahead.” she calls out while fumbling with her purse. The women seems to struggle not only physically but also mentally; distracted and distraught at the same time.

“Yes, of course.” I gesture for her to take a seat as I move my purse to give her some space.

The woman sits on the corner of the weathered picnic table and heaves a sigh of relief. A nearby raven crows and a gentle breeze caresses my skin as the two of us eat in silence.

She stares out into the parking lot when she blurts out:

“I just put down my dog.” She says as her voice cracks.

She goes on: “Man, it’s been really hard.”

“Oh, I’m so sorry.” I reply, knowing how difficult it is to lose a family member. 

“It’s only been a week, but for some reason these past few days have been the hardest.” She says staring off in the distance.

“I completely understand. I’ve been there.” I offer.

Apollo

She went on to share with me about her four legged family member named Apollo: a handsome golden retriever who was thirteen years of age and was gallant, loving and brave to the very end.

“I still feel him around me. I mean, I go on the same walks that we use to go on together and I know this may seem strange, but I feel his presence around me.” She said. I nod in agreement. “Perhaps he is.” I replied.

I go on: “We are all made up of energy and Einstein took this concept even further with the discovery that energy cannot be created nor destroyed, it can only change from one form to another.” I say.

“So perhaps Apollo is not gone per se, but has merely changed his form.” She considers this and grins. “Yes, I believe this.”

“Are you in the health profession? I ask because you have a really beautiful energy about you.” She says.

“I’m a Reiki Master and a writer.” I reply.

“Oh that makes perfect sense. You have such a peaceful, calming way about you.” she says.

Maria

Maria is her name and she works in the healthcare industry assisting the elderly. She’s also a singer and songwriter; singing on demos, as a backup singer for various artists and performing at local coffeehouses.

She bursts into laughter when she tells me more stories about her stoic Apollo; how she would sing to him and he would serenade back to her in his baritone howls. She shares how Apollo helped her to enjoy each moment, and how he reminded her to be more present each day and to appreciate everything; the shade of a grand tree, the soft grass under her feet, the warmth of the sun on her skin and his companionship.

We talked for nearly an hour where Maria reveals that doesn’t have any family nearby and that Apollo was her family. She thanks me for taking the time to speak with her.

“You know Stacy, I really appreciate you. You’ve helped me a great deal and I feel so much better.” She says.

“It’s been lovely chatting with you, Maria. If you ever want to get a cup of coffee or chat, feel free to give me a ring.” I said.

I hand her my card and a broad grin envelopes her face. “Thank you, Stacy. I’ll do that.” She says. I squeeze her hand when she rises and is on her way with a lightness in her being that was previously absent.

Vulnerability and Connection

We all need support and this need can show up in various ways; whether it’s sharing a painful experience or certain life challenges troubling us.

It’s easy to get caught up in our “other worlds” such as the ones on social media and even in our daily lives; however, even if these aspects are a part of our current reality, what is truly real is our vulnerability.

Our vulnerability is authentic, it’s what connects us as human beings. It takes great courage to show our real self; warts and all, whether it’s in our grieving, our struggles or our shadow side that we may abhor and want to push it away.

Yet, in facing our fears and being vulnerable, we free ourselves from the burden of the belief we are alone in our struggle.

Diving deeper

Once we reveal our vulnerability, we can find comfort in others who support and lift us up, who can empathise and offer us compassion, kindness and encouragement.

I think about Maria and Apollo and I’m touched by how brave she was in sharing her grief and struggles with a complete stranger. In Maria’s sharing, we were both transformed and better for it. In our connection and vulnerability not only does it bring relief, but it also brings us together and empowers us.

Both Maria and Apollo’s names are also significant: Maria is the latin form of Mary, the blessed Mother in Christianity. Some of the qualities associated with her are faith, perseverance, compassion and unconditional love.

Apollo was the sun god of ancient Greece; a powerful deity who was also the god of music, light, medicine and healing. I find it interesting that Maria and the spirit of Apollo came to me just before the Easter holiday. They were both gentle reminders to me of the power within us all.

During this holiday weekend, let us remember and come together in our humanity. Let us have the courage to reach out to others even if it’s a simple “hello” or to pay a compliment to a stranger.

May kindness and empathy lead the way to a deeper connection for a better understanding of each other and our oneness. The world is calling for it, it’s in need of us to be vulnerable, authentic and real.

With a deeper connection to ourselves and each other an inner peace fills us; creating a luminosity within and as a result, we transform. Thus a rebirth begins and as a result, we rise and awaken to the divine within us all.



Peace and richest blessings,

Napag Stacy

,

A Poem to My 110 Year Old Self.

Studies have shown that writing down thoughts and inspirations of gratitude is one of the most powerful ways to make us feel happier and to create more meaningful and joyful experiences in our lives. By expression gratitude on a regular basis, the impact can last for months and deepen one’s own well being.

A few months ago, I was part of a wonderful class; a community of writers from around the world. We had weekly assignments where we would critique, inspire and empower each other. Our last assignment was to imagine ourselves living to the ripe age of 110. Knowing that we were nearing the end of our life, we were to write an encomium –
an expression of high praise for the life we had lived.

We were not only sharing our life, (as well as what we imagined our future life would look like and be) but we were also expressing gratitude for all the experiences; the many colors of joy, sorrow, elation and anguish because all of our experiences have their lessons to teach us. Give it a try and notice where you feel more joyful in your life and subsequently, more at peace.

I chose to write my encomium in the form of a poem. Enjoy!


Firefly they call you 

Lighting up the night

Your tender belly illuminating your flight

What a majestic tapestry you are weaving

Of a well lived life.

Shine on, sweet one. Shine bright.

As you grew more curious, the seeker that you are

You reach high through the treetops to the glittering stars

And when the turmoil within your family seemed too great to bear

I gently murmured to your aching wounds –

Take heart, dear one. Take care.

The chaos of the world grew louder 

At times, you were distraught

But you kept listening, hearing my voice

You, a Phoenix rising

Continued to soar.

Fly on, free spirit. Fly on.

Meeting your beloved mate 

Under a canopy of stars deep in the African night

A love so profound you knew to wait

This man now your husband, your Chief 

And you his Queen, his wife.

Love on, brave one. Love on.

Passionately working side by side with your beloved

Building bridges beyond borders

Your conviction and joy unbound

An ambassador of peace; your mission discovering and creating 

Compassion for common ground. 

Lead on, gentle one. Lead on.

As your tapestry of light flourishes

A splendor of colors and deep, sumptuous hues

Your weaving strands connecting others

Their light shining with you.

You raise your voice for others

Standing with them in unity; their time long overdue

Honoring them with your actions and words

You stand for their truth.

Stay strong, dear one. Stay strong and true.

And even when doubt would cloud your mind

You remembered the riches of being alive

Were the experiences that cannot be changed

With the passing of time.


The thoughtful conversations with your father, hours on end

Mom tending to her garden and your child’s first grin.

Gentle kisses from your lover under a shooting star 

And cool summer raindrops caressing your warm skin —

Yes, these are the moments you will remember by far.

Remember, kind one. Remember and rejoice on.

Your love ones now encircle you

With heartfelt messages and tearful farewells

Your eyes fixated towards the heavens

You know it’s your time

You know this all too well.

For your grand life is before you

Luminous and dazzling

A blazing fire in the evening night

It comforts and soothes, it radiates and glows

As you say your last goodbye


And as your tapestry continues to unfold,

Its fiery embers float towards the infinite sky

I stroke your silvery, long mane of hair

Whispering sweetly in your ear 

One last time.

Thank you dear love, for this glorious tapestry of your life.

Thank you dear love, for shining so bright.

Peace, love and blessings,
Stacy

,

Field of Honor

“What?”  I ask in horror.

“I’m telling you this is what happened.” My husband says emphatically.

Chief Suale teaching a traditional African drumming workshop.

A while ago, Chief taught an African drumming class to some colleagues of mine; he loves sharing his culture with anyone who is willing to learn. He’s a natural, gifted teacher and on that day we communed together over stories, food, drumming and laughter.

Afterwards, Chief and I pack the drums in our car and strolled over to the Promenade in downtown Santa Monica. The 3rd Street Promenade is a popular, open-air street mall with shops, restaurants and live entertainment. I suggested Chief explore the area while I finished up work in the next couple of hours.

I met up with my husband around 4:30pm where he shares this news with me. 

3rd Street Promenade

Chief dancing and wearing the traditional Dagomba smock.

“I was sitting outside one of the stores on the Promenade, when a security guard came out, and stared at me. He just kept looking at me suspiciously like I had done something wrong.”

I’m still grabbling with what he’s saying.

 “What store was this security guard at? Why was he doing this?” I demand.

“I don’t know.” He replies. “He just kept staring at me, so I took off my hat, so he could see me and that I wasn’t trying to hide anything.”

I can’t wrap my head around this so I ask Chief some more questions to gain clarity.

“Wait, let me get this straight. You were sitting in a public space, minding your own business when this security guard came out of the store, saw you, and stares at you in a disapproving way?”

“Yes.” He replies.

“I was never in the store he was working at. Chief replies. He just stares at me as if I had taken something or planning to steal something.”

“That’s horrible!”

The 3rd Street Promenade.

I’m shouting now and a few people at a nearby bus stop glance over at us.

Chief goes on:

“Then, he went back into the store and came back out with another security guard. Now both are staring at me; sizing me up.” 

My mouth’s agape and my face goes flush while my body shakes. I’m seething, and my first thought is to march over to this store wearing a pair of steel toed Doc Martin boots, find that security guard and kick him hard in the nuts. 

Not the most enlightened reaction I admit, but it did cross my mind.  

AND YET…

This is my hudband; someone I love deeply who is being harassed and judged by the color of his skin and quite possibly by what he is wearing – a traditional Ghanaian Dagomba smock and hat.

Travel Ban

My husband and I waited nearly 4 years to be together on one continent — to physically be together for longer than three to four weeks time and even then, we were unsure if his visa would be approved because:

  1. He is from Africa.
  2. He is a practicing Muslim. 

The White House has put forth a travel ban that specifically targets certain African nations that are predominantly Muslim. Ghana was not included in this ban; however, with this current, erratic administration; who knows when that could change and turn our lives (and many others) completely upside down? This travel ban and the fact that hate crimes have grown over the past year here in the United States is deeply unsettling.

Back in Santa Monica, I turned my anger into a pep talk.

“Don’t let this person’s fear ruin your day and what just took place here at the drumming workshop. Because that is what this security guard and his sidekick were exhibiting: fear.”

“I’m not.” He says to me reassuringly.

There is still some anguish in his eyes and it sears my heart.

Chief continues.

“I didn’t want any trouble, but I also wanted them to know that if they had anything to say to me they should say it to my face, so I got up, looked both of them in the eye, and walked between them. I didn’t say anything, but I looked both of them in face to let them know if they have something to say, they should say it to me right now.”

“I’m really glad you did that.” I said. 

My husband is the sweetest, kindness, most good-natured person I know. He’s taught me so much about love and compassion and I’m certainly a better person for knowing him. That’s why this is so incredibly hurtful and hard to comprehend.  

A Realization

I realize what happened to my husband is a very small drop in the bucket in our country when it comes to racism, but it’s still racism nonetheless and since my husband is from Ghana and has rarely experienced this type of discrimination, it’s an ugly reception to his first time being in America and his new home. 

Even when we first got married, there were some friends who voiced their “concerns” about Chief and our marriage. I couldn’t believe my friends were emboldened to have conversations with me not even realizing or taking into consideration how hurtful they were being.

They masked their veil of concern as an act of “love” when let’s be real – it was racism seeping through in the most subtle ways. I truly wonder if they would’ve been as concerned for me if I had met a white male who lived in Denmark and worked in pharmaceuticals or even something less conventional, like working in the circus. No, my guess is they most likely wouldn’t be.   

A Retreat in Santa Cruz

Recently, I went on a writing retreat where a well-known author shared a story that went something along the lines of this.

A happily married couple who had been together for many years were suddenly faced with a terrible diagnosis: the wife had cancer and the chances of her surviving were slim.  

She asks her husband: “What will you do if I die?” 

After a moment, he replies:

I want to become a monk. My heart is in transcendental meditation and I feel called that this is my true purpose.”

She nods and says: “Whether I survive this cancer or not, I want you to promise me you will follow this calling.”

With the help of her husband, the wife survived the cancer. Soon after, they divorced, and he went to pursue his calling and she followed hers.

An Epic Love Story or a Horrible Outcome?

One could view this as a horrible ending or one could view it as an epic love story — where the wife knows in her heart that her husband’s passion needs to be fulfilled and instead of being tethered to their marriage, she sets him free to follow his calling.

I thought deeply about this story while I was at this retreat as the event on the Promenade involving my husband was still festering in my mind.

That evening I rang my husband.

“Hi babe, how’s it going?” I said.

“I’m fine sweetheart. How are you? It’s good it hear your voice.”  He replies.

Tears are now streaming down my cheek and even though I don’t want to say what I’m about to say – I have to.

My voice cracks:

“Sweetheart, I cannot get out of my mind what that man did to you on the Promenade in Santa Monica. Again, I’m sorry that happened and you should never feel uncomfortable sitting in a public place and being who you are.” 

I pause and gather my bearings.

“My dear, I want you to know that if you aren’t happy here or if you don’t feel comfortable and you want to go back to Ghana, I will understand.”

I take a deep breath and continue.

“You have given up so much to be here; your family, your friends and I know at times it’s been difficult. So if you feel that this isn’t working and you don’t feel comfortable or safe being here, I’ll understand if you want to leave and go back to Ghana. We will find another way.”

Silence fills the airwaves and it seems like years. I try to hold back the tears but they steadily flow while I wait for a response. Chief and I have talked about spending time in both countries; however, was I naive in thinking it would work?

Or is it simply not an option as I once thought. I can move seamlessly from my world to his and back again, but it may not be as easy for him due to America’s history with his country. I don’t want him to go, but this is purely for my own selfish reasons. I love him and I want him to be happy; his happiness is what matters now.

Finally my husband speaks.

“Sweetheart, I really appreciate you saying this to me. But I don’t want you to worry any more about that security guard so please put him out of your mind, because I’ve already have.”

He goes on.

“What’s important is our love for each other and I’m so happy we now get to be together and we can spend the rest of our lives together. So please my dear, let’s focus on our love because this is what’s important. I love you pam pam with all my heart.”

Pam pam means “very” in Chief’s native language. I love you pam pam means: I love you very much.

I’m sobbing on the other end of the phone. This man, who happens to be a Chief in his country; who takes care of many people and is the most loving, kind, generous and compassionate man is willing to put up with the hideousness of racism in our country because he LOVES me.

I want to wave a magic wand or nod my pony tail, genie head and erase racism from this earth. And while I’m at it, let’s throw in sexism, ageism, homophobia and bigotry in this vanishing act as well.

But alas, that isn’t going to happen in an instant… HOWEVER, I can do my part.

I can be that one drop in the bucket and continually add my drop until it becomes a powerful and enduring ocean.

Field of Honor

Field of Honor is a term I learned from the well known author at that retreat and I loved it so much I decided to incorporate it into my work. Field of Honor is standing up for something that you believe with your heart and soul; a declaration and the willingness to take positive action to honor it. 

  • I am standing up for Kindness. Often times we are quick to judge or criticize. When someone lashes out in anger, more often than not that person is hurting and in pain. Kindness is the tool of Compassion. Be kind. And if it’s not possible to be kind (i.e. if the relationship is abusive) than wish that person well and be on your way. Kindness also applies to yourself.
  • I am standing up for Unity. Unity at its core is connection and common purpose. From the depths of my Soul I believe we are all connected. If we realized that we’re all in this together, I believe we’d work harder to find common ground versus letting fear take over and divisiveness becoming a prevalent factor in our country at this time.

  • I stand for Equality. We as human beings all deserve kindness, happiness, dignity and respect. No one is less than or better than. We all have the same emotions, we all have dreams, we all long to be happy. Most of all, we deserve equal rights and equal opportunities.

I recently became a member of the ACLU; a civil rights organization who is one of the leading voices of fairness, justice and equality. The organization continuously works to defend and preserve the people’s rights and liberties as well as empowers communities throughout the United States.

Through conscious dialogue and positive action it is my hope I can achieve these Fields of Honor; both in my every day interactions as well as incorporating my Fields of Honor into my long term goals.

What is your Field of Honor?

Let’s begin creating a more thoughtful dialogue and look deeper into ourselves; to not only see but also make a concerted effort to do better now. Now is the time. 

Because as the great Maya Angelou said:

Now that I know better, I do better.

 This is not to shame anyone— far from it. It’s a rally cry for us; the collective whole to continually develop more thoughtful dialogue, actions and awareness towards each other.

Let love, compassion and understanding be the force that drives us versus fear, anger and hate. Because for me, this is the only path and I’m committed to it; the path of leading with an open and courageous heart filled with love, understanding and compassion.

I have decided to stick with Love. Hate is too great a burden to bear.  — Martin Luther King Jr.  

Love. Let’s find our way back to love. Or as my husband says: 

Tiyumtaba – which means: Let Us Love One Another.

Because in the end, this is what we are all made of — Love. Magical, wondrous, expansive LOVE.

Peace, love and blessings,

Napag Stacy

,

The Horse: A Noble Steed

The essential joy of being with horses is that it brings us in contact with the rare elements of grace, beauty, spirit and freedom. ~ Sharon Ralls Lemon

 

For the next few posts on this website, I’ll be sharing my time in Ghana with my partner, Chief Suale.

A Graceful and Sentient Being

The horse has been a faithful guardian and trusted confidant throughout time. It’s not surprising that this noble creature is deemed sacred and held in high regard within the Dagomba tribe and it’s clear that there’s a special affinity between Chief and grandfather’s horse; a deep bond that knows no bounds and at times, feels otherworldly.  

Communion

The evening sun fades in the distance and the first star rises into the painted sky of rich pink and purple hues. Twilight’s presence is serene. At a nearby mosque, an Imam sings evening prayers over a loudspeaker; a lullaby to the end of the day.  I close my eyes and breathe deeply, the melody is soothing and a sense of peace washing over me.  

The beauty and grace of these magnificent beings.

It’s still in the upper eighties (along with high humidity) even though the sun has set so I do my best to stay cool in our bedroom catching up on some reading. Time passes and I wander out into the great hall to discover Chief is nowhere in sight. I saunter out onto our porch, where now the darkness of the night envelopes the landscape with only a few dots of illumination gleaming from nearby houses. 

Stardust

There in our courtyard quietly sits Chief with grandfather’s horse, Stardust. Even though the Dagombas have a special bond with these four legged beings, they don’t name their horses, so I took the liberty to do so. Stardust is a striking white stallion with a silver mane and flecks of grey spots splattered throughout his torso; almost as if Jackson Pollock decided to used his body as a canvas. 

Stardust with ceremonial henna on his forelock, chest, hips and legs.

I lean against our porch railing when Stardust glances up towards me with his ears at attention. Chief swings around and upon seeing me, grins. I wave back; not wanting to disturb the silence of this unique communion. Stardust resumes grazing; chomping on some fresh cut grass from the bush that some local boys collected. Suddenly, he abruptly stops, raises his head and stares at Chief. 

Knowingness

I feel the intensity of Stardust’s gaze and I quietly take a seat in a handmade, wooden chair. A chorus of frogs bellow from the stream next to our home and the crickets chime in with their verse; a symphony of nature coming to life. I listen and feel their earnestness; a desire to become a part of this unique, wordless dialogue.

Chief and Stardust have been communing for hours; a communication beyond words; beyond any sounds or movement – it’s an exchange of energy, a sensitivity and knowingness that honors each other for who they are. To be a witness of this communion is stunning, surreal and somehow familiar. I soon realize that I’m also an active participant being a bystander; connecting with both of them in this dynamic expression.

The Medicine People

This sensing and knowingness is not uncommon in Africa and especially with the Medicine People. Indigenous healers are important pillars in the Dagomba community and they offer an array of remedies and consultations including; guidance, insight, clarity and protection. 

Chief riding grandfather’s horse.

Chiefs often need protection due to their stature within the community and horses play a unique role as protectors to the Chiefs. Medicine Men/Medicine Women prepare charms (for lack of a better term) for the horse to wear to increase his/her strength, protection and to heighten their senses to see and feel beyond the veil.

Horses also support in the journey of a Chief’s career. It’s said a horse will carry a Chief to his or her destiny and the Medicine people are able to view and discern the capability of each horse and the qualities it possesses for each Chief.

Special Occasions

One can find horses throughout Tamale and they are often a part of special occasions including marriages, naming ceremonies and funerals. Below is a link to a video of a horse dancing to the rhythm of the drums at a funeral in Tamale from a couple of years ago.

Teaching

The next morning I wake to the crowing of roosters at 5:00AM in a nearby yard. The early rays of light break across the horizon beckoning me to rise and greet the day. I wash up and take my time getting ready while the outside world comes to life; bustling with energy. 

A couple hours later, I glide through our great hall when I hear Chief’s booming voice. I glance out the window to discover he’s with Stardust and about twenty young children.

Children visiting me at our home.

 

Kids often stop by our home to pay their respects before scampering off to school.

It’s not uncommon for children to wander into our compound as they seem to be fascinated by us. I’m sure their curiosity is partly due to the fact that I’m the only Caucasian living in the area.  

The children sit in chairs and on the ground surrounding Chief and Stardust; they are a captive audience. In today’s lesson, Chief teaches and shares with the youngsters what he’s feeding Stardust and how important horses are to the Dagomba culture.    

Children after their lesson with Chief.

Wonder and joy fill their eyes and the children beam in delight. This may be the first time they have seen a horse in such close proximity. The beauty of this moment is sublime; another type of communication, one of sharing, passing down stories, traditions and culture from one generation to the next.

This is one of many aspects of Chief’s work and I’m grateful to be a witness to it and at the same time, be an active participant, partner and advocator of such endeavors for it always lifts my spirits and feeds my soul.

Chief and Stardust

With love and gratitude,

Napag Stacy

Adventures in Ghana

Hello and welcome! I’ll be sharing some travel posts here for the next couple of weeks. Some of you may know (and for those of you who don’t) my husband, Chief Suale is a Chief of the Dagomba tribe in northern Ghana. Because of our responsibilities, his duties and family being in Tamale, we travel to Ghana throughout the year. These adventures are from our recent trip.

Arrival into Accra, Ghana West Africa

Ghana – West Africa, here I come!

Arriving in Accra at 8:00pm has moments of glee and patience. Excitement because I’m about to see my husband, whom I haven’t seen in nearly two months and patience because of the time required to get through Ghana customs and retrieve luggage.

First I must explain, two months is actually a very short time for my husband and I to be apart. While that may seem long to most, it’s merely a blip on the radar in our timeline

Freedom from the Internet 

Before the approval of his visa, Chief Suale and I would go several months without seeing each other due to him being in Ghana and me in the US. Sure, we had Skype videos, telephone calls and texts, but you also must understand that in Ghana, the internet isn’t always accessible and in some places it’s spotty at best.

The Internet – a go go but maybe a little slow slow or even a no show (at times) in Ghana.

We tend to take the internet for granted in the USA without a second thought. Once you open your phone or computer, boom! Congratulations! You’re on the internet! However, in Ghana you can be without internet access for several hours and sometimes even days. Brown/black outs are frequent here and having a wifi router in your own home doesn’t guarantee internet coverage especially with the heavy, monsoon rains that come during the rainy season. 

One can view this as a gift or a curse. What I decided when I first came to Ghana is this: being in this country and the ability to travel is a unique and incredible offering that I believe is a blessing. I view the unpredictability of the internet as a welcome repose: to step away from my devices and enjoy the freedom of being off the grid.

 

Read more

The Ancient Ones – Majestic Redwoods

The redwoods are mystical, magical and anyone who has spent time within a redwood forest knows of their majestic beauty and reverence. Some of the symbolism associated with redwoods are: community, intuition, wisdom and enlightenment. Recently I had the opportunity to receive their wisdom and here is an excerpt from the experience.
Read more

The Wisdom of the Redwood Trees

The Redwoods are know as the wisdom keepers, the ancient ones. These magnificent trees symbolize forever, eternity. Their beauty is captivating and awe-inspiring.

Ancient ones.

 

I had the opportunity to commune with these incredible beings for several days and it was and continues to be a powerful experience. Deep gratitude is the word that surfaces when I lean back against their strong trunk and rest in solace.  Not thinking. Not doing.  Being.  Being fully present in the moment.

The Wisdom Keepers.

 

Where in your day can you take a moment from your to-do list and be fully present?  To fully embrace the moment, the energy, the flow of the Universe?  I guarantee if we take even five minutes out of our day to connect to this ever-present energy, we become alive, more productive and more at peace.  More to come…

 

Blossoming!

 

With love and gratitude,

Stacy